eat in my kitchen

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Tag: thyme

Crispy Pan-Roasted Coriander Potatoes with Chèvre and Lemon Thyme

Coriander Potatoes with Chèvre

Golden roasted potatoes eaten straight out of the pan are an unbeatable culinary delight. Spice it up with crushed coriander seeds, mild fresh chèvre, and aromatic lemon thyme and you’ll have an easy summer lunch (or dinner) that won’t disappoint you. It’s a rustic side for barbecued sausage, steak or ribs, you could even serve it as a cold or warm salad. But don’t forget to cook the potatoes a few hours, or preferably a day, in advance. To create crispy potatoes, they have to be cold and dry from the start.

I often enjoyed pan roasted potatoes with my mother when I visited her for a one-night sleep over while I still went to university. We would open a nice bottle of red wine, fry some onions and Tyrolean prosciutto, and mix in the crispiest potatoes. These were the perfect girls’ nights, just us, chatting and cooking, and enjoying the simple treats of life, which my mother mastered to perfection!

If you’re looking for more inspiration for roast potatoes, here are a few scrumptious recipes:

Fennel Potatoes

La Ratte Potatoes with Lemon Peel, Olives, and Parsley

Rosemary Potatoes with Feta

Spicy Potato Wedges

Roast Potatoes with Pear, Grapes, and Rosemary

Coriander Potatoes with Chèvre

 

Coriander Potatoes with Chèvre

Crispy Pan-Roasted Coriander Potatoes with Chèvre and Lemon Thyme

Serves 2-3 people

olive oil
waxy potatoes, peeled, boiled, and rinsed, about 700g / 1 1/2 pounds
flaky sea salt
black peppercorns, crushed in a mortar
quality coriander seeds (preferably organic), lightly crushed in a mortar, 2 tablespoons
fresh chèvre, crumbled, 100-150g / 3 1/2-5 ounces
fresh lemon thyme leaves (or regular thyme and a little lemon zest) 2-3 tablespoons

Let the potatoes cool and dry on a wire rack for at least 1 hour or a day and cut them into thick slices. In a large, heavy pan, heat a generous splash of olive oil and roast the potatoes on medium-high for a few minutes on each side until golden brown. Cook them in batches and turn them one by one with a fork. Season with flaky sea salt and crushed pepper to taste and transfer to a plate. Cover them with a lid to keep them warm.

Heat a splash of olive oil in the pan used to roast the potatoes and cook the coriander seeds on medium heat for 1 minute (they shouldn’t get dark). Add the roasted potato slices to the pan, mix gently with the coriander, and sprinkle with crumbled chèvre and the lemon thyme. Season with salt and pepper to taste and enjoy warm.

Coriander Potatoes with Chèvre

 

Coriander Potatoes with Chèvre

 

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Beetroot and Skordalia – a velvety Greek Garlic Potato Dip

Beetroot and Skordalia

If you feel like garlicky mayonnaise but you’re pushed away by its oily heaviness, cook some garlic and potatoes, then throw them in a blender, and you’ll end up with skordalia. This popular Greek dip has a similar smooth texture if you pulse it – it becomes thick, sticky, and starchy. The added olive oil adds a Mediterranean touch and taste to it and makes it feel like velvet. If you use a potato masher, which is more common, it will be more chunky, like mashed potatoes, so it really depends on what kind of dip you’re after. I was in a mayonnaise kind of mood so the blender was my tool of choice.

Skordalia is a new discovery for me and I don’t know how I never heard of it or tasted it before. I love Greek food, I’ve been to Greece, and I ate my way through countless Greek restaurants, but for whatever reason, I never had it on my plate until now. So I’m keeping up and made an extra large batch of it. To balance the sweetness of the potatoes and garlic, I brought in some earthy flavours: Beetroots cooked in their skins along with a bay leaf. Peeled and still warm, I cut the purple roots into wedges, and served them with generous (!) amounts of my creamy dip. Delicious!

Beetroot and Skordalia

 

Beetroot and Skordalia

Beetroot and Skordalia – a Greek Garlic Potato Dip

Serves 2

medium sized beetroots, unpeeled, 2
bay leaves 2
fine sea salt

For the skordalia

peeled potatoes, diced, about 240g / 8 1/2 ounces
large garlic cloves, unpeeled, 6
olive oil 4 tablespoons
fine sea salt

For the topping

fresh thyme leaves, about 2 tablespoons
flaky sea salt
black peppercorns, crushed in a mortar

Cook the beetroot along with the bay leaves in plenty of salted water on medium heat for about 40-50 minutes or until tender. Check the roots with a metal skewer, they should almost feel soft. Rinse under cold water and let them cool for a few minutes before you peel off their skins. Cut each beetroot into 4 wedges.

In a medium pot, bring the potatoes in plenty of salted water to the boil and cook for 10 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for another 5 minutes or until the potatoes are soft. Drain and quickly rinse with cold water. Peel the garlic and add, along with the potatoes, to a blender or food processor. Add the olive oil and a little salt and pulse until smooth. Season with salt to taste. Divide the beetroot wedges and skordalia between plates and sprinkle with thyme, flaky sea salt and crushed pepper. Enjoy cold or warm.

Beetroot and Skordalia

 

Beetroot and Skordalia

 

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Potato and Apple Stuffed Cabbage Rolls with Walnut Butter and Gruyère

Potato and Appel Stuffed Cabbage Rolls with Walnut Butter

Here we are again: I’ve reached that critical time of the year – as always in February – when it’s still all about cabbage and roots at the market, but my mind starts dreaming of juicy tomatoes and cucumbers, sweet berries and peaches, and seafood dinners at the sea – basically my summers in Malta. Luckily, February is quite a short month, then we have March, which at least offers ramps towards its end. In April I can feel the sun getting warmer, the sky becomes brighter, and the produce on my counter tops slowly starts to look more colourful. But for now, I must be patient and enjoy what I’ve got – a beautiful crisp head of cabbage.

I blanched the large outer cabbage leaves and stuffed them with boiled potatoes, sour apple, fresh thyme, and a few spoonfuls of mascarpone, instead of sour cream, to bind the mixture. My personal highlight was the topping of crunchy walnut butter and freshly grated Gruyère. Any aromatic hard cheese would work here, but there’s something about this combination of the roasted nuts and this slightly sweet Swiss cheese that fits perfectly to these little wintery cabbage packages.

Potato and Appel Stuffed Cabbage Rolls with Walnut Butter

 

Potato and Appel Stuffed Cabbage Rolls with Walnut Butter

Potato and Apple Stuffed Cabbage Rolls with Walnut Butter and Gruyère

For the cabbage rolls

large white or green cabbage leaves 8
peeled potatoes, boiled and chopped, about 250g / 9 ounces
small apple, peeled, cored and chopped, 1
fresh thyme leaves 1 tablespoon
mascarpone (or sour cream or ricotta) 3 tablespoons
organic egg 1
nutmeg, preferably freshly grated
fine sea salt
ground pepper
white wine

For the walnut butter

butter 60g / 1/4 cup
walnuts, roughly chopped, 25g / 1 ounce

For the topping

Gruyère, or any aromatic hard cheese, finely grated, about 2 tablespoons
a few fresh thyme leaves
black peppercorns, crushed in a mortar

For the cabbage leaves, take a large cabbage head and trim the bottom. Carefully peel off 8 large outer leaves. If they tear a little, it’s fine. You’ll only need 4-5 blanched leaves, blanch the remaining leaves to cover torn patches in the leaves that you use for the rolls.

Preheat the oven to 200°C / 390°F.

In a large pot, bring salted water to the boil and blanch the cabbage leaves for about 4-6 minutes or until tender. Rinse quickly under cold water, drain and cut out the hard stalk (in a slim triangle-shape).

For the filling, in a large bowl, combine the boiled potatoes, apple, and thyme. Whisk together the mascarpone and egg and season with salt, pepper and nutmeg. Add to the potato-apple mixture, stir to combine, and season with salt and pepper to taste.

Lay 4-5 cabbage leaves flat on the kitchen counter and cover torn parts with soft pieces of the remaining leaves. Put a generous tablespoon of the filling in the middle of each cabbage leaf, fold up the sides and roll it up, starting from the side of the stalk. Don’t worry if they don’t look perfect, mine didn’t either. They can all have their individual shape.

Transfer the cabbage rolls to a baking dish and cover the bottom with a splash of white wine and some water. Bake in the oven for about 30-35 minutes or until golden and firm.

While the cabbage rolls are baking in the oven, prepare the walnut butter: In a small saucepan, melt the butter on high heat. When it’s sizzling hot, add the walnuts and turn the heat down to medium. Roast for 10-20 seconds or until golden but not dark. Take the saucepan off the heat.

Divide the cabbage rolls between plates and drizzle with a little butter. Sprinkle with the roasted walnuts, fresh thyme, Gruyère, and crushed pepper.

Potato and Appel Stuffed Cabbage Rolls with Walnut Butter

 

Potato and Appel Stuffed Cabbage Rolls with Walnut Butter

 

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Roast Garlic Butter Spaghetti with Thyme

Roasted Garlic Butter Spaghetti

The amount of garlic in this velvety butter sounds intimidating but if you let go of the idea of harsh, raw garlic and think of smooth, oven-roasted cloves instead, it makes a lot of sense. For the two of us, I used 22 (!) large cloves, cooked in their skins in a hot oven. This kind of roasting turns them into a sweet, almost caramelized purée, so soft that you can mash it with a fork. I only mixed them with a bit of butter and salt and my pasta dish was almost done. Young Pecorino melted on top of the spaghetti – parmesan would have been too strong and salty – and a few fresh thyme leaves and crushed peppercorns to balance out the sweetness.

It’s a very simple dish but there’s something very sensual and satisfying about it at the same time. If I weren’t so much into tradition, I would consider exchanging my annual Christmas duck with this easy plate of pasta. A bottle of extravagant Bordeaux – bought without looking at the price, seeing that the dish itself wouldn’t cost much – and my relaxed Christmas Eve would be sorted. However, I can’t live without my slow roasted bird on the 24th December – which is Christmas in Germany – it was just a thought.

Roasted Garlic Butter Spaghetti

 

Roasted Garlic Butter Spaghetti

Roast Garlic Butter Spaghetti with Thyme

Serves 2

garlic 22 large cloves (in their skin)
spaghetti 200g / 7 ounces
butter, soft, about 30g / 2 tablespoons
flaky sea salt
young pecorino, freshly grated, about 2-3 tablespoons
fresh thyme leaves, about 2 tablespoons
black peppercorns, crushed in a mortar

Preheat the oven to 220°C / 425°F (preferably conventional setting).

Spread the garlic in a large baking dish and roast in the oven for about 25 minutes or until soft. Turn the cloves occasionally and mind that they don’t burn. Let them cool for a few minutes, peel them out of their skins and transfer them to a blender or food processor.

Cook the pasta in a large pot in plenty of salted water until al dente.

Add the butter and a little salt to the garlic in the blender and purée until smooth. Season with salt to taste.

Mix the warm spaghetti with the garlic butter and divide between plates. Sprinkle with pecorino, thyme, and pepper. Season with salt to taste and enjoy!

Roasted Garlic Butter Spaghetti

 

Roasted Garlic Butter Spaghetti

 

Roasted Garlic Butter Spaghetti

 

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Potato, Apple and Onion Pie with Taleggio

Potato, Apple and Taleggio Pie

I appreciate a good pie with a buttery crust all year round but there’s something particularly satisfying about this hearty dish on a cold autumn’s evening. Since the season started, I’ve already pulled a few of them out of my oven, Nigella Lawson’s potato, cheese and spring onion pie is one of my all time favourites. Imagine coming home after a walk through the pouring rain, your bones cold and clothes wet, and then you see – and smell – this golden beauty on the table. Just the idea is so tempting that I could walk straight back into my kitchen and bake another pie.

Nigella’s recipe inspired me to think about possible potato fillings wrapped in short crust – with apples and shallots for example. The fruits are at their peak at the moment, crisp, firm and packed with juices, they fill the air in my kitchen with the sweet smell of autumn. I sliced them thinly and layered them with onions to melt into the rich aroma of fresh thyme and milky Taleggio cheese. It was a good pie, especially in combination with German black pudding sausage (Blutwurst), thickly sliced and cooked in butter. I love this season!

Potato, Apple and Taleggio Pie

 

Potato, Apple and Taleggio Pie

Potato, Apple and Onion Pie with Taleggio

Serves 3-4

For the filling

potatoes, diced, 350g / 12 1/2 ounces
heavy cream 4 tablespoons
fine sea salt
ground pepper
nutmeg, freshly grated
fresh thyme leaves 2 1/2 teaspoons
medium sized shallot, thinly sliced, 1
small sour apples, quartered, cored and thinly sliced, 2
Taleggio cheese, chopped, 70g / 2 1/2 ounces

For the pastry

plain flour 300g / 2 1/3 cups
fine sea salt 1 teaspoon
butter, cold, 150g / 
5 1/2 ounces
organic egg yolks 2
cold water 2 tablespoons

For the glaze

organic egg yolk 1
milk 1 tablespoon
a pinch of salt

Cook the potatoes in salted water for 10 minutes, drain and let them cool completely.

Mix the cooked potatoes with the cream and season with salt, pepper, nutmeg and thyme to taste.

For the pastry, combine the flour with the salt in a large bowl. Cut the butter into the flour with a knife until there are just small pieces left. Continue with your fingers and quickly rub the butter into the flour. Add the egg yolks and water and continue mixing with the hooks of your mixer until you have a crumbly mixture. Form 2 discs, dividing the dough roughly 2:1, wrap in cling film and put in the freezer for 10 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C) (conventional oven).

Whisk the egg yolk, milk and salt for the glaze.

Take the dough out of the freezer and roll out both discs between cling film, the bigger piece for the bottom and sides and the smaller one as the lid of the pie. Line a 23cm / 9″ shallow pie dish or a 20 ½cm / 8″ loose bottom springform pan with pastry. Spread the potatoes on top of the dough, cover with a layer of onions and a layer of apples and finish it off with the cheese. Close the pie with the smaller pastry lid, gently push the rim with your fingers to seal it. Make a few small holes in the top with a skewer and brush the pastry with the egg glaze. Bake the pie for 15 minutes before you turn the heat down to 350°F (175°C), bake for another 45 minutes or until the pie is golden and the pastry is baked through. Let the pie cool for at least 15 minutes before you cut it into pieces.

Serve on its own or with thick slices of black pudding cooked in a pan in hot butter for just a couple minutes.

Potato, Apple and Taleggio Pie

 

Potato, Apple and Taleggio Pie

 

Potato, Apple and Taleggio Pie

 

Potato, Apple and Taleggio Pie

 

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Potato, Apple and Taleggio Pie

 

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Pumpkin Pesto, Date and Ripe Chèvre Sandwich

Pumpkin Pesto, Date and Aged Chèvre Sandwich

They are finally back on my windowsill – colourful pumpkins in all shades, shapes and sizes! At the beginning of a new season I tend to hoard nature’s new produce like a squirrel. My excitement for the fruits and vegetables that I’ve been missing and looking forward to for months causes irrational behavior at the market. When I came home with enough pumpkin to feed a large Mediterranean family I thought it would be a good idea to purée one of them and make space on my crowded kitchen tops. I turned it into a pesto.

Pesto comes from the Italian word pestare, meaning to pound and to crush, herbs are the most common ingredient but vegetables are an equally delicious but often neglected addition. Broccoli, asparagus, beans, peas, there are no limitations. Winter squash is packed with taste and subtle sweetness, once puréed the texture is so smooth that it seems like pumpkin is practically made to become a pesto. You can use canned purée or cook the squash in the oven, which I always prefer, it tastes better. My bright pesto is refined with orange juice and zest, thyme and the vegetable’s seeds. I went for Hokkaido as you can use its skin and I appreciate its nutty flavour, butternut or Musque de Provence work just as well. I’m sure it would be scrumptious stirred into warm spaghetti but I spread it voluptuously on a sandwich instead, with dried dates to enhance the sweetness and Sainte-Maure de Touraine affiné, an aromatic ripe Chèvre.

Pumpkin Pesto, Date and Aged Chèvre Sandwich

 

Pumpkin Pesto, Date and Aged Chèvre Sandwich

Pumpkin Pesto, Date and Ripe Chèvre Sandwich

You can also use the pumpkin pesto for pasta dishes.

Makes 3 sandwiches

dark buns, cut in half, 3
Sainte-Maure de Touraine affiné, sliced, 80g / 3 ounces
(or any other aged Chèvre)
dried dates, pitted, quartered, 3-4
fresh thyme leaves, 1 tablespoon
pumpkin seeds 1 tablespoon
black peppercorns, crushed in a mortar

For the pumpkin pesto

Hokkaido (with skin) or butternut squash (peeled), cut into cubes, 350g / 12 1/2 ounces
pumpkin seeds 2 tablespoons
olive oil 2 tablespoons
freshly squeezed orange juice 1 tablespoon
orange zest 1/4 – 1/2 teaspoon
fresh thyme leaves 1-2 teaspoons
salt

Preheat the oven to 200°c / 390°F (convection oven). Spread the pumpkin in a baking dish and fill the bottom with water (about 60ml 1/4 cup). Wet a large piece of parchment paper, big enough to cover the baking dish and lay it on top of the pumpkin. Cook it in the oven for about 20 minutes or until tender but not mushy. Purée the pumpkin in a food processor, add the pumpkin seeds, olive oil, juice, zest, thyme and salt and purée until smooth. Season with orange, thyme and salt to taste.

Spread the pumpkin pesto voluptuously on the bottom side of a bun, lay the Chèvre on top and sprinkle with pumpkin seeds, dates, thyme and pepper. Enjoy!

Pumpkin Pesto, Date and Aged Chèvre Sandwich

 

Pumpkin Pesto, Date and Aged Chèvre Sandwich

 

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An Autumn Breakfast – Mushroom and Potato Buns with Thyme

Autumn Buns with Mushroom, Potatoes and Thyme

As soon as the sweet and earthy smell of my warm autumn buns reached my nose, I felt at peace again and forgave my gnocchi recipe for not performing as expected. A few days ago I mentioned that I had the genius idea to make mushroom gnocchi with chopped porcini and chanterelles stirred into the mixture. However it was a rather frustrating experience, no matter how much flour I added to the soft dough, it was too moist and the texture didn’t change at all. It was impossible to form anything resembling gnocchi. After adding a full 1kg-package (2 1/4 pounds) of flour I gave up, it seemed hopeless and I was ready to chuck everything in the bin. Luckily my boyfriend suggested turning the dough into bread – a juicy loaf of potato bread, fluffy, light and juicy – simply satisfying. All of a sudden the recipe made sense, I mixed in a little more flour, some yeast and let it rise for an hour. This gave me enough time to calm down and think about how I’d like to shape my aromatic autumn creation. I went for buns, 24 to be precise, enough to eat mushroom potato buns for the next 2 weeks. It wouldn’t have been a big deal, they taste fantastic, but I decided to freeze half the batch for cozy weekend breakfasts. Instead of going to the bakery on Sunday mornings I’ll just switch on the oven and fill my kitchen with the aroma of thyme, porcini and chanterelles. 24  buns made of 1600g (3 1/2 pounds) flour can be a bit intimidating for a weekend baker so I scaled down the recipe by half.

The past few weeks have been so busy that I didn’t even realize that it’s been a month since we got back from our Mediterranean island. I miss it, of course, and I felt so happy when Molly from My Name Is Yeh asked me if I’d like to meet her in Malta. A short trip with friends took her to the archipelago and I would have given a lot to make it possible for us to finally meet after our cross-continental kitchen talk a few months ago. Unfortunately, I didn’t manage, the final work on my book has kept me anchored to Berlin and my computer. But she went and enjoyed it so much that she wrote a sweet post about her 3-day trip and her new culinary discovery: Timpana, click here for her travel experiences!

I’ve kept one special bit of news for the end: Ever since I held Nigella Lawson’s Domestic Goddess in my hands for the first time, I’ve been a great admirer of her work. So when she decided to share my vanilla profiteroles on her Instagram, it was a very, very happy day. Thank you Nigella! And here it is!

Autumn Buns with Mushroom, Potatoes and Thyme

 

Autumn Buns with Mushroom, Potatoes and Thyme

Mushroom and Potato Buns with Thyme

Keep in mind that the potato mixture for the dough has to cool in the fridge before mixing it in, you can prepare this step a day in advance.

Makes 12 buns

floury potatoes, cut into cubes, 450g / 16 ounces
butter 30g / 2 tablespoons
organic egg yolks 2
plain flour, white spelt (type 630) or unbleached wheat, 810g / 6 1/4 cups
dry yeast 1 sachet (7g / 1/4 ounce)
salt 4 teaspoons
ground pepper
nutmeg, preferably freshly grated
fresh thyme leaves 1/2 tablespoon
mixed mushrooms, finely chopped, 100g / 3 1/2 ounces
(half porcini, quarter chanterelles and quarter king oyster mushrooms)

Cook the potatoes in salted water until soft, about 15 minutes, drain well in a colander and press through a potato ricer. Mix immediately with the butter and egg yolks and let it cool down to room temperature before you put it in the fridge to cool completely. You can prepare the mixture a day in advance.

Scrape the cool potato mixture into a large bowl.

Combine the flour, yeast, salt and a generous amount of ground black pepper and nutmeg. Add the dry flour mixture, the thyme and mushrooms to the bowl with the potatoes. Mix with the hooks of an electric mixer for about 7-10 minutes until well combined. The dough will be soft and damp, if it’s too sticky, add more flour. Cover the bowl with a tea towel and let it rise in a warm oven (35°C / 95°F) for 60 minutes (top/ bottom heat and not fan-assisted!).

Punch the dough down, take it out of the bowl and knead for half a minute. Divide it in 12 portions, dust your hands with flour, put a portion of dough on the palm of your hand and roll with the other hand, holding it like a dome. Turn the dough for about 1o seconds on the palm of your hand until its top is round and firm, this builds up surface tension and prevents the buns from becoming flat. Continue with the remaining dough and lay the buns on a baking sheet lined with baking paper. Cover them with a tea towel and let them rise for about 15 minutes in a warm place.

Set the oven to 220°C / 430°F (top/ bottom heat).

Bake the buns for about 11 minutes or until golden brown, knock on the bottom of a bun, it should sound hollow.

Autumn Buns with Mushroom, Potatoes and Thyme

 

Autumn Buns with Mushroom, Potatoes and Thyme

 

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About helping and sharing – and a Provençal Artichoke Quiche

Provençal Artichoke Quiche

Everybody’s life can be a feast and a tragedy at times, it can be calm and peaceful in one second and rocky and rough in the next. In these moments, all of us need a helping hand or someone who listens. I believe, I know, that there’s no one out there who wasn’t ever in need of help. It starts when we’re born, when our mothers are there for us, giving without asking for anything in return. That’s love. And all along the way, we meet so many people who are there for us and reach out when in need. Shouldn’t we all be willing to do so? Why is it so hard for some to show compassion and be there for the ones in need of help? Why can’t we – as those who are much better off and on more stable ground – be there for the ones who are hurt, exiled and persecuted? I believe we should treat others as we would want to be treated. If we refuse to help why should we expect help when we are in a difficult situation?

My grandmother decided to leave East Germany when the wall – die Mauer – was being built, she had to flee with 6 children. They went to West Germany with literally nothing, they left their farm and land behind to escape a regime that she and her husband didn’t want their children to grow up in. They we’re refugees in what was once their own country. But they weren’t alone, many people helped them to build up their future, many shared the little they had and my family managed to get back on their feet. 40 years later, East Germany was in need of help, the people of the West gave a share of what they had, out of solidarity, to rebuild a part of the country that had suffered for decades. The people in the East received help. That’s compassion. Today, hundred thousands of people are willing to risk their lives and leave their homes to seek help in Europe and other wealthy parts of the world, to escape political systems that are also no longer safe to live in. Wouldn’t we all do the same? Didn’t we do the same throughout the history of human kind?

Provençal Artichoke Quiche

Paul from the Einfach-Lecker-Essen blog started the Blogger für Flüchtlinge (Bloggers for Refugees) initiative with a few of his friends to call for support and collect donations for refugee camps, first only in Berlin, and now all over Germany. The movement is growing quickly and more and more stand up every day to give a helping hand to the ones in need. Please spread the word if you write a blog (#BloggerFuerFluechtlinge), you can support the initiative with a donation here.

Today’s recipe is a dish that is practically made to be shared – a fragrant golden quiche. A quiche is like a friend, it always makes me feel good and at home wherever I am, it’s down to earth comfort food. Add some preserved artichoke hearts, tomatoes, olives, thyme and aromatic Gruyère cheese to the filling and you have a late summer Provençal picnic tart. And when we sit there in peace, enjoying the food together with the ones we love, a scene that’s so normal for most of us, we shouldn’t forget that this is what everybody aspires to. Nothing more and nothing less.

Provençal Artichoke Quiche

Provençal Artichoke Quiche

For a 30cm / 12″ tart pan or baking dish you need

For the short crust base

plain flour 260g / 2 cups
salt 1 teaspoon
butter, cold 130g / 4 1/2 ounces
organic egg 1

For the filling

organic eggs 4
heavy cream 125ml / 1/2 cup
sour cream 175g / 3/4 cup
fresh thyme leaves 3 tablespoons plus a few sprigs for the topping
salt 1 teaspoon
ground pepper
nutmeg, freshly grated, a generous amount
large preserved artichoke hearts, cut in half (lengthwise), 3
black olives (preferably Kalamata) 10
cherry tomatoes, cut in half, 10
Gruyère cheese (or any other aromatic hard cheese), grated, 2-3 tablespoons

For the pastry, combine the flour and salt in a large bowl. Cut the butter with a knife into the flour until there are just little pieces of butter left. Continue with your fingers and rub the butter into the flour until combined. Add the egg and continue mixing with the hooks of your mixer until you have a crumbly mixture. Form a disc, wrap in cling film and put in the freezer for 12 minutes.

Set the oven to 200°C / 390°F (top/ bottom heat).

Roll out the dough between cling film and line the baking dish with the flat pastry. Prick it with a fork and blind-bake in the hot oven for 15 minutes or until golden.

Take the baking dish out of the oven and set the temperature down to 180°C / 355°F.

Whisk  the eggs with the heavy cream, sour cream, thyme, salt, pepper and nutmeg.

Arrange the artichoke hearts, olives and tomatoes on top of the pre-baked pastry base, pour in the egg-cream mixture and sprinkle with cheese. Bake the quiche in the oven for about 55 minutes or until golden brown, the top should be firm. Let it cool for a few minutes and garnish with the thyme sprigs. Serve cold or warm.

Provençal Artichoke Quiche

 

Provençal Artichoke Quiche

 

Provençal Artichoke Quiche

 

Provençal Artichoke Quiche

 

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provencalquiche13

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