eat in my kitchen

To cook, to bake, to eat and to treat.

Tag: doughnut

Ricotta Beetroot Doughnuts, New York and my 4th book launch

New York Book Launch

The monotony of clouds and waves kept me in a daze while we crossed the Atlantic, but then, when I finally spotted Nova Scotia from high up in the skies, I was as excited as a little girl. Soon we’d land in New York JFK, to open the last two chapters of my overwhelming Eat In My Kitchen book tour. New York and Washington DC had been on my itinerary for months, but to know that I’d be there in just a few hours gave me shivers.

This trip was emotional, which I got used to after weeks of being on the road in London, Berlin, and Malta, my emotions seem to be tied to a rollercoaster. And now New York, this city filled with so many dreams and visions, vibrant, loud, and bright, it never rests. As we stumbled out of the subway, packed with all our bags and suitcases (I took a few pounds of Maltese sea salt with me), my view was drawn to the sky, along the shiny facades of the city’s famous skyscrapers. Jet lagged, happy, and with an espresso in my hands, I felt breathless as I stood on the vibrant streets of Greenwich Village.

New York Book Launch

Ten days on the East Coast allowed me to dive deep into this magical city, to meet and get to know so many people and to enjoy some of the most delicious treats. I hadn’t seen my dear friend and editor Holly La Due in more than a year, and to step into her office on Broadway for the first time, to finally meet the entire team of Prestel Publishing that worked on my book, almost made me cry. And we ate – constantly! There was so much to discover, so much to try, it felt like traveling the world through food, but in one city. My palate enjoyed the most amazing Jamaican curry, Cuban stew and pies, Korean BBQ, Indian treats, and American classics. Our breakfasts were luscious, every day: The richest Challah French toast, fluffy blueberry pancakes, huge muffins, crunchy cookies, fudgy brownies, perfect bagels, fine lobster roll, juicy burger, creamy clam chowder, and generously filled sandwiches. New York is heaven on earth if you love food. The quality is outstanding, proven by the fact that we didn’t experience a single bad meal, I can recommend almost every restaurant we went to as you can see in my list below. One of the treats that struck me on our last day was a gorgeous pink doughnut at Bryant Park Holiday Market filled with ricotta and covered in sticky beetroot glaze. This combination is so good that I decided to come up with my own recipe and share it with you. My version is a soft and spongy oven-baked yeast doughnut refined with orange zest and sprinkled with pistachios. Next time I’ll fry them in oil, which adds that extra rich flavour plus calories.

New York Book Launch

There’s no better way to explore a city than on foot, so as we ate our way through Manhattan and Brooklyn, we also got to walk on the elevated High Line, a 1.5 mile long city garden. It’s an impressive green oasis along the closed tracks of the West Side Line. I couldn’t miss Tiffany’s, the melody of the film classic in my head, I pulled my boyfriend into the sparkling shop on Fifth Avenue after we took a little break at Central Park. We managed to see a live performance and also Nan Goldin’s Ballad of Sexual Dependency at MoMA, and a fantastic show at The Met Breuer, by James Kerry Marshall called Mastry. And visiting Kenzi Wilbur at Food52‘s holy test kitchen in Chelsea (picture below) was another highlight. It was quiet when we approached the 9/11 memorial, as I stood there for about 10 minutes, in silence, I noticed how all the sadness and anger I felt turned into peace at one point. It’s a place that reminds us that love is the only way, and not hate.

New York Book Launch

 

New York Book Launch

I came to New York to present the Eat In My Kitchen book, at a wonderful book launch feast at Maman NYC and at a cozy book signing event at the beautiful – and so tempting – Whisk kitchenware shop on Broadway. It’s my first book, and to have had these two unforgettable celebrations in New York makes me feel very humble. I can’t thank everybody enough who’s been involved in both of the events. Maman is a stunning space with high ceilings in TriBeCa, founded by Michelin starred French chef Armand Arnal, Elisa Marshall, and Benjamin Sormonte. They are the sweetest team and they did everything possible to turn our event into a very special night. Chef Hetty McKinnon from Arthur Street Kitchen, and author of the cookbook Neighbourhood, prepared the recipes from my book for this special event. She’s a precious gem, as a chef and as a friend. My trusted partner Meridiana Wine Estate shipped their glorious Maltese wine over the Atlantic just for our event – our American guests are already thinking about how they can get hold of this wine from Malta in the future. Marisa Dobson is the power woman who helped me so much, organizing all my events in the US, and she introduced me to Baked (see the list below). Photographer Maria Midões is the lovely woman who captured the magic of our night at Maman in her gorgeous pictures. I had a dream team in New York, accomplished by the support of my wonderful publisher Prestel and of my boyfriend. He made me enjoy every second of this trip – especially breakfast, lunch, and dinner – at least twice as much. You can’t create a book on your own, but you also can’t send it out into the world on your own. Thank you, my friends!

New York Book Launch

This trip was all about people and food. We sat at the table with so many inspiring people, publishers, bloggers, food lovers, and journalists, fans of the Eat In My Kitchen blog and book, family and friends. We ate and drank wine, we discussed, laughed, and spoke about food, art, books, and culture; and about politics – it was two weeks before the sobering elections. So this trip had to sides, we felt our excitement, the excitement of two travellers exploring a new terrain, but we could also feel that there was something in the air. The people around us, and even the two of us, were anxious and had premonitions that the future might not bring what we all hoped for, a world without a US president who disrespects people, women and men, who humiliates people because of their sex, religion, skin colour, and culture. Today we know better. I always saw the USA as a vibrant melting pot of cultures, and I admired the country for this reason. To exchange ideas and traditions is fruitful, and not frightening. We are what we are because we evolve, we learn from each other, we need each other to widen our mental horizon. History, especially the not so distant German history, has shown what happens when we build walls, mental and physical walls, when we separate ourselves from the others. I feel pain when I hear the words of the newly elected American president, his words disgust me. But I don’t want to feel scared, I want to believe that deep inside we all know what’s right and wrong. We know compassion, we know that all the hate spread throughout our human history didn’t create anything good, just more destruction. It frustrates me to see that a single small minded, greedy and bitter old man can shake so many people, all over the world. But frustration doesn’t help, that’s democracy and democracy only works when we communicate, so let’s keep the dialogue going.

New York Book Launch

Here are some of my favourite food spots:

Manhattan

Baked TriBeCa, American bakery (they bake Oprah Winfrey’s favourite brownies)
Maman TriBeCa, coffee, bakery, and events
Tina’s Cuban Cuisine
Luke’s Lobster East Village (the best lobster and crab roll and clam chowder)
Clinton Street Baking (New York Magazine voted: the best blueberry pancakes)
ABC Kitchen (their spinach, chèvre, and dill pizza is a revelation)
Stick With Me (Susanna Yoon’s finest confectionaries)
Black Seed Bagels (delicious tuna melt and salmon bagel!)
Pondicheri New York (acclaimed Indian restaurant)
Food market at Bryant Park, especially The Doughnut Project
Salumeria Biellese Deli (the best sandwiches lusciously filled with Italian prosciutto and cheese)
Blue Bottle Coffee
Eileen’s Special Cheesecake
Jongro BBQ (Korean BBQ, be prepared for loud! music)
Russ and Daughters
Compagnie des Vins Surnaturels
Hot Pot Under de Tree in Harlem (Jamaican Diner on Frederick Douglass Boulevard)

Williamsburg – Brooklyn:

Khao Sarn (delicious Thai soups and papaya salad)
The Rabbit Hole (cozy breakfast spot, try the challah french toast with strawberry mscarpone!)
Extra Fancy (American restaurant, seafood and burger)
Peter Luger Steakhouse (reservation needed!)
Vanessa’s Dumpling House

New York Book Launch

Ricotta Beetroot Doughnuts

Makes about 16 doughnuts plus doughnut holes

For the dough

plain flour 325g / 2 1/2 cups, plus about 2 tablespoons if the dough is too sticky
fast-acting yeast 1 1/4 teaspoons
granulated sugar 50g / 1/4 cup
fine sea salt 1/2 teaspoon
orange zest 1/2 teaspoon
milk, lukewarm, 155ml / 2/3 cup
butter, melted and cooled, 20g / 1 1/2 tablespoons
vanilla bean, scraped, 1/2
organic egg 1

For the filling

fresh ricotta, whipped, 250g / 9 ounces

For the glaze / topping

icing sugar 200g / 2 cups
beetroot juice 4-5 tablespoons
unsalted pistachios, chopped, a small handful
orange zest 1 tablespoon

For the dough, combine the flour, yeast, sugar, salt, and orange zest in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook. Whisk together the milk, butter, vanilla seeds, and egg – the mixture should be lukewarm – and add to the flour mixture. Knead on medium speed for a few minutes until well combined. The dough should be soft and moist, but not sticky. If it’s too sticky, add a little more flour. Transfer the dough to a table or countertop and continue kneading and punching it down with your hands for about 4 minutes or until you have a smooth and elastic ball of dough. Place the dough back in a clean bowl, cover with a tea towel, and let rise in a warm place, or preferably in a 35°C / 100°F warm oven (conventional setting), for about 60 minutes or until almost doubled in size.

Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper.

When the dough has almost doubled in size, punch it down, take it out of the bowl, and knead for 1 minute. On a lightly floured countertop, using a rolling pin, roll out the dough until it’s about 1cm / 1/2″ thick. Using a 7 1/2cm / 3″ round cookie cutter or glass, gently cut out circles and transfer them to the lined baking sheets. Using a 3 1/2cm / 1 1/2″ cookie cutter or shot glass, stamp out the smaller inner circles and arrange them around the doughnuts on the baking sheet. If you use a smaller cookie cutter for the inner circles, the hole in the middle will close while baking. Cover with cling film and let rise in a warm place for about 25-30 minutes or until puffy.

Preheat the oven to 190°C / 365°F (conventional setting).

Bake the doughnuts and the doughnut holes for about 6-8 minutes or until light golden and still soft. If you’re not sure, take out one doughnut and cut it in half to see if it’s baked through. Transfer to a cooling rack and let cool completely. Cut the doughnuts in half and spread each bottom with about 1 heaping teaspoon of ricotta.

For the glaze, whisk the icing sugar and beetroot juice until smooth, the mixture should be quite thick. Using a teaspoon, sprinkle the glaze generously over each doughnut and doughnut hole. Immediately sprinkle with pistachios and a little orange zest.

New York Book Launch

 

New York Book Launch

 

New York Book Launch

 

New York Book Launch

 

New York Book Launch

 

New York Book Launch

 

New York Book Launch

 

New York Book Launch

 

New York Book Launch

 

New York Book Launch

 

New York Book Launch

A Sweet Berliner – Our Family Feast

Berliner

A long time ago, my family started a beautiful tradition. All my sisters, their children and friends of the family meet at my mother’s house in the countryside to celebrate carnival. We listen to silly carnival music, the children dress up in funny costumes and we make huge amounts of a special traditional carnival pastry – the famous “Berliner”. When the sweets are done, we fill them in my mother’s large white bowls from Tuscany, place them on her long table and enjoy the fruits of our work, which usually goes on for hours. In general, I can’t say that I’m too fond of the 5th season (the name given to carnival time in Germany) but the mood and the food at my mother’s home makes me love it!

The sweet speciality we make looks a bit like a doughnut without a hole, it’s made of yeast dough, filled with jam and deep fried in vegetable shortening. It has different names in different regions but where I come from, which is the center of carnival in West Germany, they are called “Berliners”. Funnily enough, they are called “Pfannkuchen” in Berlin, which means pancakes. In the Swabian area in the South of Germany where my step father comes from, people call them “Fastnachtskuechle”. I could continue endlessly with even more names “Krapfen”, “Kreppel”, seemingly every region wanted to give them a name of their own.

So we all gather in my mother’s kitchen and each of us has a specific job to do in the making of our “Berliners” – which never changes. For years now, my job is to watch the sweets together with my step father while we fry them in a large cast iron pot. We have to turn them and dust them with sugar when they are done. My mother and sisters, on the other side of the kitchen, take care of the dough and filling the “Berliners”. On my photos you can also see some free shaped sweets which are the bits and pieces of dough that are left after cutting out circles.

Carnival is still a month away (and I’m also not at my mother’s house at the moment) but there is a reason I made my own “Berliners” at my home now. I was asked to participate in a blog tour with 13 other blogs from America and Australia and write about “Hearts At Home”. My heart is always where good food is and that’s at my home most of the time but also at carnival at my mother’s together with my family. Our tradition, to meet at this time and to make this special food means a lot to me. I look forward to seeing my loved ones and spend a few wonderful, silly days together with them. That’s where my heart is and that’s home to me. Making “Berliners” without my family was still a fun experience. I was a bit worried that I wouldn’t manage on my own but I did, and even more so it was surprisingly easy which makes me think about having this adventure more than just once a year! Below you can find all the other great blogs who wrote about their own personal view on “Hearts At Home”.

Berliner

 

Berliner

Blueberry Jam Filled Berliner

I made 12 jam filled “Berliners” plus several free shaped sweets (without filling), all in all of 500g / 1 pound of flour. I melted 1kg / 2 pounds of vegetable shortening for deep frying in a large pot, enough to allow the sweets to float freely. My mother uses a much bigger pot and 3kg / 6 pounds of shortening but she starts off with 3kg / 6 pounds of flour as she has to feed more hungry people than I did.

plain flour 500g / 1 pound
dry yeast 1 package for 500g / 1 pound of flour
sugar 3 tablespoons
vanilla sugar 1 package
salt scant 1 teaspoon
milk, lukewarm, 250ml
butter, melted and cooled down, 80g / 3 ounces
blueberry jam, around 200g / 7 ounces for filling
egg white, mixed with a fork, 1-2 to stick the discs of dough together
vegetable shortening 1kg / 2 pounds for frying

For dusting
50g / 2 ounces of icing sugar sieved together  with 3/4 teaspoon of cinnamon

Combine the dry ingredients, add the milk and butter and mix with your dough hooks for 5 minutes. Continue kneading and punching with your hands until you have an elastic dough ball. Put the dough back into the bowl, cover with a tea towel and let it rise in a 35°C / 95°F warm oven (top / bottom heat) for about an hour.

When the dough has doubled in size, take it out, punch it down and knead with your hands for 2 minutes. On a floured working surface, roll the dough out in batches and cut out 10cm / 4″ circles (I used an old tea cup from my grandmother). Put the bits and pieces of dough which are between the circles aside as you will fry them as well (without filling).

Heat the shortening in a large pot on highest temperature.

Take one disc of dough, drop a teaspoon of jam in the middle and brush the edge with egg white. Put a second disc on top, sealing well by pushing with your fingers along the outline twice to make sure that they won’t open in the hot fat.

To check the temperature of the fat, put a piece of dough inside, carefully as it’s very hot! Turn it with wooden spatulas or spoons, it should be done within a few seconds. The “Berliners” might take a few seconds longer. They will become a bit dark, that’s normal, but they shouldn’t burn, so adjust the temperature if necessary. Keep in mind that if it’s too low the inside won’t cook through. I always cut the first “Berliner” in half when I think it’s done to see if I have to change the setting.

When you take them out, let them cool for a few seconds before you dust them with your cinnamon icing sugar.

Berliner

The “Hearts At Home” Blog Tour

Shabby Art Boutique
At The Picket Fence
My Soulful Home
Town & Country Living
Bright Bold & Beautiful
Vintage Farmhouse
White Lace Cottage
Stone Gable
On Sutton Place
Lilacs & Longhorns
French Country Cottage
Eat In My Kitchen
Top This Top That
Emily A. Clark 

Berliner

 

Berliner

 

Berliner

 

Berliner

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox

Join other followers:

%d bloggers like this: